not wild… garlic

can we go from apple blossoms to garlic mustard ?  yes.  it is just a plant.  and strangely enough there is a place where this plant is in its natural habitat.  it just is not here.  and not a lot of other places where it wants to take over.  this was growing here in the yard this spring.  it is the first time it has shown up here in the years i have been gardening.  the trick is to get it before it goes to seed.  this is one plant that will not go into the compost pile.  it is on the noxious weed list here in Ohio and in many places.  follow local disposal instructions.

detail garlic mustard

garlic mustard

15 thoughts on “not wild… garlic

  1. clarepooley33

    It is always surprising to hear terrible stories about plants I think of as harmless and welcome. This plant is native to Britain and is kept in check by natural forces and is needed by native insects. I can’t think who would want it in their formal garden, though. How did it get to the States I wonder? The dangers of letting your plants escape into the wild!

    Reply
      1. Kathie Chicoine

        I grew up in Lakewood about 10 minutes from the airport. I miss all the spectacular azaleas in Cleveland . The soil is not not good in Chicago and they are few and far between and usually very scraggly.

      2. John Hric Post author

        Kathie, this winter was rough on azaleas. at least here. and roses and hydrangea. we lost several and the most of the survivors don’t look so well. the bright side – it makes room to try new things. thanks for your comments !

  2. hilarycustancegreen

    I have this in my UK garden and pull some up almost daily. It would take over if I didn’t keep a firm hand on it, but I had no idea it was a really serious weed. It goes in my green waste disposal bin.

    Reply
    1. John Hric Post author

      hilary, there may be natural balances in its native European habitat to keep garlic mustard in check. here it runs positively wild and overpowers the other native plants. most plants by nature try to do their best to dominate over their neighbor plants. some just do way too well in this task – especially when the natural predators and competitors are taken out of the picture. with garlic mustard – here at least – pulled and composted the seeds are not destroyed and come back as if they were never pulled. annoying to say the least.

      Reply
    1. John Hric Post author

      The garlic mustard is growing wild in way too many areas urban and rural across north america. The flower is pretty, and the plant has lots of vitamin C. However the plant is spreading out of control and forcing other plants out of their natural habitat. And there is always a little bit more to learn for all of us. Even if it is garlic mustard.

      Reply
  3. fodrambler

    This is one of my favourite salad leaves and even if it is your habit to buy bagged salad this one is well worth adding. It has a wonderful garlic herby flavour. It grows wild in the hedgerows here. I can see why you wouldn’t want it in your garden but it is great to be able to pick fresh salad from the hedge. 🙂

    Reply

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