seedling

lavender petals. a yellow throat. and just a hint of ruffles. the cross is Kyoto Swan x Wanda Evans. first the seedling. then the parents.

16 thoughts on “seedling

  1. circadianreflections

    Can I be frank? It’s blah to me. Neither the violet, yellow, or white are prominent, or vibrant… not a solid theme or color being dominant. To me it’s…all rather, blah. The stamens aren’t tight like they normally are and seem to me to be disrupted and thrown out of sorts dare I say chaos? I know absolutely nothing about seed breeding and flower development so, I apologize for being pedestrian. I’m merely sharing what I feel right at this moment seeing your image of this flower.

    That you are this far into flower breeding is astonishing to me. Outside of you the only other botanist that I ever took the time to notice was Luther Burkank, You are as amazing! I love the results so, so much! 😀

    Reply
    1. John Hric Post author

      Frank is always acceptable. Not every daylily has to be your favorite. Or mine. There are plenty of varieties for each of us to choose what we like. Personally I am pleased with the results of this one. It improves on various qualities of both parents. It is a first year bloom so it needs a bit of time to mature and achieve its mature look. And while I like the look I will be crossing it with something else and hoping for something a little bit more. And putting two plants together even after years of experience does not guarantee the new result. Even after all these years there are plenty of surprises. Enjoy the ones you like CR. Thanks !

      Reply
    1. John Hric Post author

      It is done blooming now. Next year who knows? I like to do contrarian crosses. Those that spin the wheel of fortune. I never know until I see the ‘right’ two parents. Then it is let’s see what happens ?!

      Reply
  2. Gradmama2011

    Nice family; pretty lavender. How far back in the family tree of the seedlings can/do you trace? This lavender color, of the seedling is much bolder than the parents. I’m curious as to what the grandparents individually contributed to the lineage. Awhile back I followed a link in your side column which went into minute detail about color mixing….I would like to find the chart again, can you send me a link?

    Reply
    1. John Hric Post author

      I will have to look for the link on color mixing. I believe that was someone else’s theory. To be honest I seldom worry about color combinations very much. But that would be a long discussion. The chart is a starting point and tempered by my own experiences. Good information to start with but not a hard and fast rule. It is subject to the plants one starts with geneticly speaking and tempered by results. You can have two yellow daylilies. One might have very strong yellow genetics and mostly give yellow seedling. The other might have a more varied color background and throw a wider variety of colors in its seedlings. So basically I try a cross and see what happens. The 18-150 cross is a good example. I got kids one each resembling each parent. i will look for the link.

      Reply
      1. Gradmama2011

        thanks. I know I learned some of this stuff in biology class. Recent dabbling in human geneology, my own specifically…I found a photo of a great great aunt of my mother that (to me) is the spitting image of one of my granddaughters. I have four, all look completely different. That’s a lot of mixed up genes 😉

      2. Gradmama2011

        Indeed. One of my granddaughters asked me once, after spotting a family snapshot on my bulletin board, “who are all those people that look like my Mom?” LOL (She is the same one that resembles my Mom’s Aunt Maud. ) That is my Australian branch. Of course Aussie is not a designation in itself, that Grandfather had had a two or three generation line that were actually from Wales, Scotland, England…etc.

    1. John Hric Post author

      Yes and no. I suspect the ‘natural’ pollinator of daylilies no longer exists. So the odds of current creatures attracted to daylilies seldom pollinate the. So yes it might happen and no because the odds of it happening are very low.

      Reply

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