About

A gardner in Northeast Ohio

I grow daylilies and other perennials in the shadow of Hopkins airport.  Mostly daylilies.  There used to be a vegetable garden here.  Between the weather and the trees the veggies lost out.   Now there are lots of bought daylilies and even more seedlings grown from those daylilies.  And each year a little less urban turf as the turf grudgingly gives up its space.

The garden is mostly organic.  I try to ignore the residue of jet fuel that drifts down.  The rest is compost, cosmic and terrestrial dust, peat, mulch, and organic fertilizer added to the yard.  Turf is intentionally used in lieu of the “G” word.  The turf is usually green and a mix of new and previous invaders held in check by the mower and little else.  The bees, worms, and other fauna have enough of a battle without petro-chemicals and other _cides.   There are honeybees somewhere in the vicinity and they visit periodically.  I suspect they are feral and not of the agricultural worker variety.

Now isn’t that a wild concept.

11/28/11

Regarding awards.  I won’t say never.  However the current rationalization is the purpose of this blog is to share the garden and daylilies in particular.  While I certainly appreciate the compliment at this point awards will be graciously declined.  I will try to focus on the sharing.  enjoy.

193 thoughts on “About

    1. John Hric Post author

      Thanks terry ! Glad you enjoy them. There are lots of daylily gardens in Indiana all over the state. Hope you get a chance to visit one sometime this summer. John

      Reply
      1. rahreee

        Daylilies look so much like orchids that I Googled them to see if they were related (or if some daylilies were really just orchid varieties lol). I had an orchid once, got it to bloom too, but it died, likely from too much sunlight, turns out orchids really prefer shade with slight sunlight. Perhaps a daylily would be more suitable!

      2. John Hric Post author

        Orchids are both tough plants and delicate plants. Rebloom at home is not an easy thing. Especially in a house or apartment. Daylilies prefer sun, at least 6 hours per day. And the more sun, generally speaking, the better. Thanks for your comment. And even though I know there are many physical differences between daylilies and orchids I often think on other levels they are very much comparable. Your comment makes me wonder how distant the two plants are in the world of botany. They are both monocots and to my thinking somewhat primitive plants, though that might not be the right way to phrase it.

    1. John Hric Post author

      Thanks Multifarious. It is a tad better than a concentrated spot. For about a month and a half or two months it is a very big spot of color. From what I am told the fragrance is an iffy thing with the daylilies. Some are supposed to have it but even that can come and go with the weather. I do notice the fragrance when I clean them for trading.

      Reply
  1. Jackie

    Thanks so much for visiting my blog and liking my photo! I appreciate it very much. I really like your photography and I look forward to following your posts. 😀

    Reply
  2. pishnguyen

    Hi! Thanks for stopping by my blog, and for the “like” on my recent post. I am happy you enjoyed the post, and I appreciate your visit to my site.

    Your blog is beautiful. I love all the information and the gorgeous flower pictures.

    Reply
  3. Chas Spain

    Hi John – thanks for visiting my blog – nice to read how other gardeners are getting on with their little pieces of the planet. Good to see. Day lilies are such wonderful flowers -ever rewarding – I can understand why you’re dedicated to grow them

    Reply
  4. Carolyn Morgan

    Anyone who loves day lilies as much as you has my vote. Thanks for like my painting “Where secrets hide” and I plan to follow your blog. All the best from Australia!

    Reply
  5. wrygrass.com

    Thank you for stopping by my blog and your wise idea for the trash can lid for the compost bin when needed. I am totally amazed at the innumerable species of daylilies, I had no idea! I’m opposite of you….I grow veggies and few flowers. Maybe I need to put in some of these beauties. Thanks again…Candice

    Reply
  6. Kathi

    I LOVE lilies, although we live where ground squirrels eat all but the wild varieties. Looking forward to viewing some of yours! I’ve finally started a “garden room” inside because the deer and critters seem to devour 2/3 of everything I plant outside.

    Reply
  7. Marian Ehrlich

    Thanks for the “like” on Tea Time 2. I am happy to find your blog. I also love day lillies. In the summertime on Cape Cod, we have lots of day lillies. The deep, gorgeous reds and vibrant oranges are my favs. I can’t wait to see them again this year. They return like an old friend that I await. Have a great day! Marian

    Reply
  8. envisagebeauty

    I think having one’s own garden is just beautiful. I myself love gardening. Did you know, when you talk to your plants or sing with them they grow even taller and healthier? It’s just so lovely to watch. Mother Nature is beautiful. What’s even more beautiful is that we are a part of her!

    Reply
  9. mybeautfulthings

    Thank you for visiting and liking a post. I love your Day Lilies. We used to grow a variety when we lived in Yorkshire but they have not been successful here in Cornwall. 🙂

    Reply
  10. beeseeker

    Take it from me; even the bees that use hives from which we take honey are not tame – in any sense of the word – but wild animals making the most of what humans provide for them.
    Like the ideas going on here: good luck with it all.

    Reply
  11. macingosh

    I don’t know much about daylilies and unfortunately, I cannot call a garden my own, but still I would like to thank you for stopping at my photoblog and dropping your like. Best regards from Munich

    Reply
  12. Luann

    You have an interesting, informative and delightful blog. I thank you for stopping by my Rural Rhapsody blog and liking one of my posts. By doing so you have introduced me to your world, and I will be following you for sure.

    Reply
  13. John Hric

    Luann, Glad you enjoy the blog. There are lots of daylily gardens all around Michigan and a lot of them have open gardens during the summer. There is nothing quite like a daylily garden in full bloom. Thanks for visiting and the nice words.

    Reply
  14. writerwannabe763

    We love daylilies .. We had a garden with so many …and have just moved in Oct. where there is no garden just waiting to have some beautiful ones planted in them…Diane..

    Reply
  15. Alison

    Hello John, nice to ‘meet’ you, and your day lilies. They’re so beautiful, and I never knew there were so many varieties!
    Thanks for visiting our blog, and for the ‘like’ on the Laos post. I hope you continue to enjoy our ramblings. Another post on Laos to come in the next couple of days.
    I’m sure you’ll understand why we’re not doing much gardening these days 🙂
    Cheers
    Alison

    Reply
  16. Brett

    Thanks for coming by to like my post at Backyard Philosophy, I really appreciate it. I love daylilies. My parent’s garden has so many. They are beautiful and vivacious. Keep up the blogging. Cheers.
    –Brett

    Reply
  17. bgbowers

    I think that you and your blog are wonderful! Sorry, I went on a bit of a “like” binge.. 🙂

    Reply
      1. Tom Simpson

        John, thanks so much! I had to travel only about about thirty feet for that shot, unlike the other two. 🙂

  18. missinghenrymitchell

    Hi, John.
    Thank you for liking my post. Your daylilies are beautiful and I am impressed with your breeding efforts. I have always thought it would be fun to try, but I do not know what I am doing. I am glad to have found you and look forward to learning from you. Have a good long weekend.

    Reply
  19. ksbeth

    i love your blog concept, the lilies are beautiful. i look forward to reading/seeing more. thanks for stopping in and reading mine as well – beth

    Reply
  20. jalal michael sabbagh.http://gravatar.com/jmsabbagh86@gmail.com

    Impressive and colorful about.Thank you so much for following my Blog l will follow yours to read your interesting posts.My regards.jalal

    Reply
    1. John Hric Post author

      Lets say I rarely cut them. Since they only last a day there is little point to cutting. One can cut off the individual flowers and float them in a bowl or in a cup. Have done things like that on occasion. Thanks for visiting !

      Reply
  21. beautyofsimplycity

    Hi, thanks for liking my post ‘A Look Into A Mountain’ 🙂
    Your daylilies are just beautiful, I wish I had some, but I’m not sure they’d survive the wacky climate here… ^^a

    Reply
  22. oneobserving

    Good for you for creating a garden in the shadow of an airport. Although I am not a gardener, I admire those who are. I believe gardens are special places. Thanks for sharing yours with readers. Best Wishes!

    Reply
  23. Ruth Amick

    Thanks for stopping by my little blog! I live in an apartment right now, so only have potted plants on my patio. I have been a gardener all my life, and write informational articles on this subject. I haven’t written anything about the daylily yet, but would love to learn more about them.

    Reply
  24. edgar62

    Thank you for your visit. I like your garden. My back is mainly concrete, brick and gravel, but I have managed to plant a few flowers in the places the previous owners left unpaved,

    Reply
  25. siskinbob

    Thanks for visiting my humble blog. We too have day lilies in our garden though only the one variety. Browsing your site it would seem I need to go out and explore the varieties that are available….. Wow !!!

    Reply
  26. Maggie

    Thanks so much, John, for visiting my blog “Tide Line Still Life”. Your blog is lovely! Day lilies are remarkable in their variety and resilience. It is a joy to peruse your photos and remarks. Best, Maggie

    Reply
  27. hilarycustancegreen

    Thanks for the visit, John, the day lilies are wonderful. I have some but they struggle a bit in our very dry, sandy garden (yes, even the UK has dry areas). We are under a flight path about thirty miles from an airport, but air not too bad. The veg bed is making a comeback after being eliminated for many years, but I am enjoying it. We also have ‘turf’ – you could supply a botanic department with the variety of plants therein.

    Reply
  28. John Hric Post author

    Hilary,
    Your garden sounds neat. Particularly like your turf comment. Mono culture grass – even if it is a blend is an empty place. The more variety the better, and the greener it will stay as one or more plants move into their peak as the seasons change. Thanks for the visit and comments !

    Reply
  29. johnhadden

    Thanks for liking my photos. Though I’ve lived in Vermont for the past 30 years, I was actually born & raised in Chagrin Falls! Small world! My Mom and sister still live there. And my daughter is currently going to Oberlin College! Small world! Great shots of daylilies. You’ve got some beautiful varieties in your garden.
    Cheers,
    John

    Reply
  30. Maggie Beck

    John, you are so kind to notice so many of my posts. I hope you will continue to post on you site through the cold, Ohio winter!

    Reply
    1. John Hric Post author

      Maggie, I think I might have a ‘few’ pictures set aside to get me through the cold season. Actually I have been into those pictures for the last 3 or so weeks. As for your wonderful pictures, if I could I would wander the woods and creeks frequently. And the beach would be a favored alternative . The water’s edge is a place of discovery. Thanks for the comment Maggie !

      Reply
  31. mesanger

    Beautiful blog! I just moved from the northeast to Colorado, so will be discovering what grows. Meanwhile — love the pictures of your lilies! Thanks!

    Reply
      1. mesanger

        Northeast Colorado, in the foothills of the Rockies. Can’t wait for spring! And I’ll do a lot of reading in the winter, on what works where… (Low water important here!)

      2. John Hric Post author

        Yup ! You will be on the dry side, or should I say the drier side ? Just about everywhere there water is a short resource. Good luck and happy gardening !

    1. John Hric Post author

      Whichwaynow101. I won’t say never, but giving up the garden here is one of the last things I plan to do. Safe travels ! And I hope the flowers here continue to fill the gap.

      Reply
  32. booklovinggrandma

    My hat’s off to you. I’m all for turning urban space into a garden and a haven for wild critters. (The first often naturally results in the second.) Thank you for liking my blog post.

    Reply
  33. harmonioustew

    gardening is something all of us should learn to do. i’ve heard it’s a great way to get acquainted with the rhythms of nature, and to cultivate patience, a life-saving virtue. thanks also for liking my blog post.

    Reply
  34. edgar62

    I don’t know about patience – all my garden is teaching me at the moment is how to better use a sweeping brush. Since the mini-storm (gusts of 119 kph) we seem to be in a wind tunnel. It is frustrating more than anything. The wind dries out the soil and what that does not kill off, the birds do. Well, at least the birds are happy :o) Thank you for visiting.

    Reply
  35. The Crazy Crone

    My husband’s the gardener in our partnership – he has really green fingers and creates lovely gardens wherever we live. On the other hand, I look at plants and they wilt and die even though I love nature. So I’ll stick to photography and art about nature, I think it’s safer for the plant world!

    Reply
    1. John Hric Post author

      Brigid,

      Thank you so much for the compliment. I do not do the awards. So you did your part by all of the instructions. I am going to keep busy doing the blogging and by pass the other part. Thanks again. And I do so much enjoy your blog – so congrats to you on the award.

      John

      Reply
  36. John Hric Post author

    Deky, Congratulations on receiving the Sunshine Award. And thank you so much for the compliment and nomination. You will pardon me if I decline. For now I prefer to keep it simple and stick to the blogging. Thank you.

    Reply
  37. niasunset

    Thank you for visiting my blog. I am so glad to meet with you and with your amazing blog. I love flowers but to be honest I haven’t a good experience in gardening… There are many things that I should learn. Thank you for sharing with us, it would be so nice o visit your day lilies… With my love, nia

    Reply
    1. John Hric Post author

      nia, thank you for your comments. for me gardening is leading me to learn photography. perhaps never as good as the images you capture, but perhaps good enough to properly show the flowers. life is a learning experience. should you wish to try gardening again find someone who grows a garden in your climate. they can give you some of the secrets. thank you for sharing your pictures !

      Reply
      1. niasunset

        You are welcome John. During spring and summer we live in a village near to Istanbul where I live. And we have a garden there, this year I am planning to plant something with myself, of course I will get help from friends 🙂 Most of them have a wonderful plants, not only flowers, but vegetables too. But as you noticed, photography means a lot for me, I live with my camera 🙂 You are welcome and Thank you, have a nice weekend, love, nia

  38. steven1111

    Greetings friend! I’d like to thank you for commenting, liking or following my blog. As such I want to nominate you for the Dragon’s Loyalty Award. Please go to this site: http://gardeningingreenwood.wordpress.com/2013/12/30/the-dragons-loyalty-award/ to read the rules and decide if you want to accept it or not. It’s your choice and I hope you will, but it’s up to you. Mostly I want you to know that I appreciate your loyalty to me and my writing. Thank you so much!
    Steve

    Reply
      1. steven1111

        John, You’re very welcome for the award. And thank you for your congratulations. I do understand your feelings and thank you for letting me know how you feel. I just wanted to thank you… 😉
        peace,
        Steve

  39. John Hric Post author

    You are not mistaken. They are resting at this time. Most assuredly resting. Typically bloom can start the beginning of June through the first week of August. And sporadically continue up until October and beyond. Our garden is very close to Lake Erie and some years the lake affect will moderate temperatures so there are a few November and occasionally December blooms. However that did not happen this year, no December blooms ! That being said – do come back tomorrow, there are plenty of pictures to carry us through until next June.

    Reply
  40. windhound

    It’s wonderful to have a positive obsession _ I think my blog postings are my day lillies. I imagine that your eye must dedect many subtle nuances between individual flower shapes as well as the colours. I really appreciate your Follow and wish you happy days browsing through dragonshades while your Lillies are resting.

    Reply
  41. firecook

    Thanks for liking a post . Your garden sounds pretty. I also like to take pictures of flowers I have to wait for summer for more:) Have a nice day.

    Reply
  42. kathryningrid

    Huge fan of Hemerocallis myself, though I have somewhat limited success with them in north Texas. If and when we retire back to WA we might have a better shot at it! 😉 Meanwhile, I’ll look for beautiful portraits of those dandies here to feed my addiction. 🙂 Glad to have ‘met’ you over at my blog, and I look forward to exploring here at yours further!
    Cheers,
    Kathryn

    Reply
  43. Pingback: The Liebster and Versatile Blogger Award | The Pursuit: Being Creative

    1. John Hric Post author

      beingcreative, thank you kindly for the nomination. and congratulations on your awards. i must respectfully decline the nomination. i prefer to stay focused on the blog and keep things simple. thanks

      Reply
  44. Elina

    Thank you John for following my blog, I appreciate it! Your blog is lovely, with so many lilies in your garden it must look miraculous and so beautiful! 🙂

    Reply
  45. akeem54

    My sinxcere apreciation for you ‘like’. Coming to blogging, i have realised that there are so many things important to so many people. your’s among other gardening bloger is unique.

    Reply
  46. icelandpenny

    Hi, thanks for the like on my “March the Trickster” post. I like your comments here and the attitude they reveal, e.g. being as organic as possible; I was also struck by your reference to feral honeybees. That distinction had never occurred to me but of course you’re right. Loving daylillies, perhaps you already know the people at Earthbound (www.earthbound.com), a terrific nursery near the village of Red Bay on the Bruce Peninsula, which juts northward into Lake Huron, dividing the main body of the lake from Georgian Bay to the east. Some wonderful gardeners up there…

    Reply
    1. John Hric Post author

      Hi Penny,

      I hope there are some feral bees here. Not sure. I keep hearing about folks not too too far away that have hives in the city. So I just might be wrong on the feral part ! I will have to check out the nursery. I do not believe I am familiar with it.
      Thanks for the tip on Earthbound and your visit !

      Reply
  47. beckarooney

    Great bio! I’m a trainee horticulturist in England, I can only imagine how different gardening is here compared to where you are. Looking forward to reading more of your work! 🙂 x

    Reply
  48. The Word Explorer

    Thank you for following my blog and for liking my post on hemerocallis. I am planning to devote the month of April to flowers and hope you will enjoy exploring other flower roots with me. I look forward to exploring more of your blog!

    Reply
  49. susanpots

    Thanks for visiting my blog. I grow a few day lilies, and have a question for a day lily professional as yourself: I have read that day lilies can help hold a bank in. A bank as in a hillside, or bank of dirt. Have you ever heard of that?
    I am slowly transplanting day lilies to a small embankment above a terraced flowerbed. I thought they might hold the hill in and would look so pretty when they flowered. One glitch, so far, the two colors of day lilies planted do not flower at the same time. So, I guess I should look at it as flowers in later spring (yellow) and summer (orange).

    Reply
  50. John Hric Post author

    Susan, I don’t know that daylilies are particularly better than any other plants for holding a bank in place. I have no personal experience with that use. I do see several websites do recommend them for that use. Not knowing how steep the bank I would recommend you consult a landscape professional that can actually look at your garden bank and give you an answer. If in your judgement the bank is not very steep then it sounds like a good idea . Daylily roots go down 8 to 10 inches in the soil. They will help hold the soil in place. However given enough rain and too much slope any soil can and will shift. (search ‘erosion control slope daylily’)

    As for the colors and timing that is pretty much a personal choice. There are quite a few daylily growers in Oregon. And at all price ranges. If nothing else they are fun to visit, especially when they are in bloom. You might find some that round out your yellow and orange. And some that balance your bloom season. Daylilies range from extra early to very late. Stella’s Ruffled Fingers is a short pink one that when it is happy ( a fair amount of water and decent soil nutrients, and 6+ hours of sunshine ) will bloom all season long once it becomes established. At least that is what it does for me. I see at least one grower that sells it in Oregon.

    I hope I have answered your question.

    Reply
  51. myobscureview

    Hi,
    Thank you for visiting my blog and liking my post. Wow whenever I look at something like your blog I so wish I had green fingers but alas, no!!
    Keep up the great work and thanks again.
    Kind regards
    Wayne

    Reply
  52. angela1313

    Thank you for visiting my blog. Gardening and plants have always brought me happiness and I look forward to reading about your gardening.

    Reply
  53. navasolanature

    What a lovely idea to just focus on the lilies near an airport. My home in London is near Heathrow and sometimes has that jet fuel smell. I posted on lilies I saw in some of the back streets of Manchester, a city in the north of the UK. Some people cared enough to plant lovely white lilies but for others there little bit of front garden was where the bins went! An area that is now mainly let and although a poorer part of the city I think it is still the older residents who keep some parts looking good! Glad to see your blog and like the samadhi lily very much. Hope you find peace.

    Reply
  54. erica0angelique

    Hello,
    Thank you for the like on my post “Garden Pretty”. You have beautiful pictures on your blog, I love the “Samadhi” flower, lovely colors. Have a wonderful day! 😀

    Reply
  55. dbp49

    Since photographing flowers is one of my favorite pastimes, your site was a natural for me. Thanks for the like, and thanks for the pictures. They’re beautiful.

    Reply
  56. susanpots

    thanks for finding my blog – so I could discover yours. Your daylilies are so beautiful. I knew they came in a number of colors, but just a glimpse at your blog, and I am amazed!
    Have you ever heard of daylilies holding an embankment?
    These plants sure are hardy here in SW OR.

    Reply
    1. John Hric Post author

      Glad you enjoy the daylilies ! They have roots that can go about 12 – 16 inches deep. So I imagine they would help. Enough rain and nothing will hold the embankment. Thanks for the comment !

      Reply
  57. hfdratch

    Wonderful gardens. I live now in tropical Yucatan in a city but miss my day lilies of many years in the Hudson Valley of NY. Your photos evoke memories of blooms and edible buds.

    Reply
  58. unsimplelife

    Don’t know too much about Daylillies, but out of wonder, do you know anything about growing Orchids??? (or anyone for that matter)

    They are special to me, my late mothers favourite flower/plant. We have tried a few but they never seem to take off, and then die.

    Anyone have any ideas? (sorry if this may be off topic btw)

    Reply
    1. John Hric Post author

      Just little tidbits of orchid knowledge. Many of them are epiphites – they grow in trees. The aerial roots are part of the mechanism they use to collect water. they do take a bit of home work to get the conditions right for the different types of orchids. and when you trim the plants you need to sterilize the scissors between cutting one plant and another. there are plant viruses that can be spread if you do not. otherwise you are better off not trimming them.
      Best thing to do is find out the variety of plant you are caring for and understand the individual requirements of care. It can be done. It is just a different set of rules from daylily care. I hope you are able to sort it out so you can enjoy them. Try searching ‘orchid care’ there are plenty of articles like this one… http://www.finegardening.com/success-orchids-indoors and they will get you started.

      Reply
  59. mrsabott

    Hi John, thank you for visiting my blog. Your flowers are truly inspirational. My pitiful garden and greenhouse crops are in complete and utter shambles at the moment due to a combination of the harsh Australian sun, some very pesky gnats and the introduction of our now 6 month old golden retriever. Thankfully there is no jet fuel. I will definitely have to get in there and give it another go this year… now if I could just put down my art journal… maybe after I sketch a lily or two!?

    Reply
  60. Kathy

    Thank you for liking my blog, education-spring.com. Daylilies are a mainstay of my garden. They remind me of gorgeous summer days and make me feel connected to folks whenever I drive by a patch in bloom. They’re just coming up here in New England after our monster winter.

    Reply
  61. thewritesteph.com

    Thanks so much for visiting my blog! I have a ton of daylilies of different varieties. I got some from friends, some from the nursery, and some from the Huntsville (Alabama) Botanical Garden daylily sales each fall. I like them because they grow so well here (zone 7) and they are so easy to divide and share.

    Reply
  62. adegrandis

    Thank you for visiting and liking my photo – daylilies are amazing and tough as well, we managed to grow them on a windswept rain lashed hillside in mid wales. Brilliant spots of clour as they struggled up each year and stuck it to the weather!

    Reply
  63. Gay Nell Olive

    Thanks for the like on my blog. I love your day lilies . I only have two varieties myself. I used to live by someone who had a large day lily garden selection. They were beautiful as yours are. I am enjoying discovering all the wild flowers currently around me.

    Reply
    1. John Hric Post author

      Nia – thanks for the nice compliment. I am very happy you have received the sunshine blogger award. I do not do awards. At least so far I have not. I will answer the one question. 8,489 km from Cleveland Ohio to Istanbul

      Reply
      1. John Hric Post author

        Now it is my turn to wow. 8,489 km = 5275 miles ! I could drive to Seattle, WA , clear across the country and back again and still not hit 5275 miles.

    1. John Hric Post author

      Cleveland to Seattle would be a 36 hour driving time one way trip. If it could be a drive to Istanbul it would be somewhere in the range of a 10+ day trip.

      Reply
  64. lifehelps

    How fun to find other gardening enthusiasts! I am really rethinking how I manage mine: I have done organic gardening forever; now I am thinking about it in terms of bee friendly and true to the environment.
    I’ll drop in again.

    Reply
    1. John Hric Post author

      Glad you found your way here. Every so often we come to points where we adjust and try things a little differently. I would enjoy hearing how you adjust the garden. enjoy !

      Reply
  65. raastha

    Thanks for stopping by and liking my post. I dont publish in open forum as i am yet to be a versatile writer like yourself and many other. Thanks for motivating me.

    Reply
  66. J.Gi Federizo

    First, thanks for the follow 🙂
    Second, you would like my horticulturist friend 🙂
    Three, I say accept awards as they should be given freely, without strings attached. You don’t have to follow the so-called rules 😉

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s